Le Corbusier brought great passion and intelligence to these essays, which present his ideas in a concise, pithy style, studded with epigrammatic, often provocative, observations: “American engineers overwhelm with their calculations our expiring architecture.” “Architecture is stifled by custom. It is the only profession in which progress is not considered necessary.” “A cathedral is not very beautiful . . .” and “Rome is the damnation of the half-educated. To send architectural students to Rome is to cripple them for life.”

Profusely illustrated with over 200 line drawings and photographs of his own works and other structures he considered important, Towards a New Architecture is indispensable reading for architects, city planners, and cultural historians―but will intrigue anyone fascinated by the wide-ranging ideas, unvarnished opinions, and innovative theories of one of this century’s master builders.